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FAQ

When should I start planning to study abroad?
Early planning is the key to successful study abroad. Hundreds of study abroad opportunities exist; they differ in location, duration, curriculum, language, degree of cultural immersion, cost, and many other factors. In order to find the program that is the right “fit” for your personal and academic objectives, you should begin planning your study abroad experience at least one semester before you actually depart.

Who can participate in study abroad?
Most programs are designed for students who have already studied at least 1 year at a university. Many programs require a GPA of at least 2.75, but some of the more competitive programs require a 3.0 GPA. General qualifications for acceptance include good academic standing, letters of recommendation, and a personal study statement. Language requirements vary per program. Additional qualifications may exist depending on the program to which you apply. See application procedures for more information.

 How will a study abroad experience enhance my employability after I graduate?
Employers increasingly seek graduates who have international experience, and a study abroad experience will enhance your employability. International knowledge, cross-cultural communication skills, flexibility, resilience, and the ability to adapt to new circumstances are skills enhanced through study abroad that are important to employers in various fields.


According to a June 2007 article in the Going Global newsletter, global executives say that “study abroad boosts employability” and here are a few reasons why:


• Three out of four executives cite study abroad as important when evaluating candidates for junior-level positions.
• Eight in 10 human resource (HR) executives surveyed believed that a study abroad experience was an important factor for overseas job placement within their companies.
• Two-thirds (67 percent) of HR executives surveyed said that a study abroad experience within a culturally diverse student environment distinguishes a job candidate.

 Why should I study abroad?
Study abroad is an enriching and eye-opening adventure, where learning extends far beyond the classroom. The experience will expose you to new ways of thinking, living, and viewing the world. Benefits include the opportunity to learn about another culture firsthand, learn an entirely new language or become fluent in one you have already studied, you can travel, fulfill major and minor coursework requirements, and develop new intellectual pursuits, skills, and perspectives. By living within another culture, you are likely to gain a new understanding of, and perhaps even appreciation for, the United States and its way of life. You can also expect to make friendships and create memories that will last a lifetime.

Be notified of all the accepted date of scholarships Forum where he received academic lectures and awareness, cultural and university admissions are delivered to students.

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Student Visa Interview Advice

Visa  Although you should remember to bring all potentially useful documents, it is also important to remember that the visa interview is a conversation, not a document review session.  The best thing that you can do is to clearly articulate

  

Visa

 Why you want to go to the specific school ?

 

Visa

 What you plan to study?

   

Visa

 How you plan to use your education when you return home?

Be ready to cover this information in no more than about 3 to 5 sentences, and practice saying those sentences with family and friends until you become comfortable with the English.

Here are some of the types of questions that you might get asked:

Visa

    Why have you chosen this university?

Visa

    Who will sponsor your education?

Visa

    Why don’t you study this in your own country?

Visa

    Do you intend to work in the United States? Remember that only very limited amounts and types of                  work are permitted under student visa status.

Visa

    What are your plans after finishing the degree?

Visa

    What was your TOEFL score?

Also important, as for any first conversation, is to dress nicely and smile. 

In regard to documents, it is better to have too many documents than to have too few. Just keep them in order so you can find whatever you may need.

U.S. Admissions: Choosing and Applying to a University

 US Study  How do I choose a college or university?

With over 4,000 accredited institutions in the United States, there is much to consider.

Some particularly important factors include 

US Study  Accreditation recognition.

Be sure the institution is accredited by a body recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.

Also be aware that some countries and employers have additional expectations; for instance, some do not yet accept degrees earned through distance education.
US Study   Areas of study. Even the biggest schools do not prepare students for every career be sure the types of programs that you are interested in are offered by the schools that you are considering.
Cost.

Tuition and fees can differ a lot between one U.S. university and another.

Living costs will also vary depending on location. Look not only at costs but also at how much financial aid may be available—in some cases expensive schools may be able to offer good financial aid.
US Study   Location. Variations in climate and landscape are large in the United States.

Consider also whether you would prefer a campus located in an urban, suburban, or rural setting.
US Study   Type of institution. Institutions may be public, private, or religiously affiliated. They may be large or small, have many international students or only a few.
US Study    Qualifications and research interests of faculty. A match with faculty interests is particularly important for graduate students.
US Study    Facilities and special resources or programs.

For instance, if you are not fluent in English, you may want to look for a school that has an English language program on campus.
US Study    Admissions standards.

How closely do your qualifications match those of students accepted to the school?

This can give you an idea how likely you are to be accepted.

Which are the best schools?

The United States does not publish any official list of best universities. Some private organizations compile "best" lists that have been created based on such factors as research funds or the opinions of professionals in a given field. These lists vary considerably in their conclusions, which is not surprising given that over 4,000 accredited U.S. universities and colleges currently operate, each with its own goals and strengths.

Often the most famous universities are also the most expensive and the most difficult to enter. The "best" university is going to be the one that is right for you—one that offers your field of study and meets other criteria important to you such as location, financing, housing, and facilities for international students.

Which schools are the least expensive?

Can you give me some tips on things I can do during the application process that will reduce the costs of my study?

 

Read more from here 

 

If you still have questions not answered on our site, you are welcome to contact us.

US Admit ion  When I apply to universities, what admission tests may I be expected to take?

US Admit ion  TOEFL. If English is not your native language, you must submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. Many institutions require a minimum score of about 80 on the Internet-based (iBT) TOEFL, about 213 on the computer-based version of the TOEFL (a version of the test no longer offered), or about 550 on the paper-based version for both undergraduate and graduate students to enter their academic programs. A few schools may not require the TOEFL if you completed high school or college in the United States or if you graduated from a four-year, degree-granting institution where English is the language of instruction.

US Admit ion  SAT® Reasoning Test®. The SAT Reasoning Test may be required of undergraduate applicants. No standard score is required; results are weighed with secondary school grades and other elements of the undergraduate application.

US Admit ion  SAT Subject Tests. Each SAT Subject examination tests knowledge in a specific subject area. One or more may be required of some undergraduate applicants.

Read the Artical from HERE 

You are welcome to contact us.

Funding U.S. Study
USAEducation is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

USA    Planning
USA   Sources of Financial Aid
USA   For More Information on Financial Aid Information

USAPlanning

Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

USA    College and university application fees
USA   Fees for standardized tests
USA    Tuition
USA    Required fees
USA    Travel expenses
USA   Housing and meals
USA    Books and supplies
USA    Health insurance
USA    Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.
Sources of Financial Aid

The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

The U.S. government provides some limited aid to international students, primarily at the graduate level. The AMIDEAST or other EducationUSA center nearest you can provide details on current programs. You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.
For More Information on Financial Aid don't hesitate to call us .

Funding U.S. Study
USAEducation is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

USA    Planning
USA   Sources of Financial Aid
USA   For More Information on Financial Aid Information

USAPlanning

Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

USA    College and university application fees
USA   Fees for standardized tests
USA    Tuition
USA    Required fees
USA    Travel expenses
USA   Housing and meals
USA    Books and supplies
USA    Health insurance
USA    Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.
Sources of Financial Aid

The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

The U.S. government provides some limited aid to international students, primarily at the graduate level. The AMIDEAST or other EducationUSA center nearest you can provide details on current programs. You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.
For More Information on Financial Aid don't hesitate to call us .

Tips on Planning Your Travel to the United States

Travel to any new place can be stressful if you’re not well-prepared. Here are some tips for a smooth trip to your U.S. college or university.


USA  Timing Your Entry

You can arrive in the United States using your student visa up to thirty days before the start of your academic program. At a minimum you will want several days to recover from jet lag and adjust before your schedule becomes busy.

Also find out when your college or university’s orientation program for international students will be held.

Arrive in time to attend this and other student orientation events—such programs cover important information on campus resources and requirements.

If you will have to change planes during your trip, allow plenty of time—at least three hours between flight arrival time and any connecting flight’s departure.

Remember that you will have to go through port of entry procedures, you may need to travel from one airport or terminal to another, and of course your arriving flight may be delayed.


USA  Planning Ahead to Avoid Travel Complications

Let the international student office at your college or university know your travel plans well in advance of your departure , also ask them about the best ways to get to campus and the approximate cost.

Make sure that your housing arrangements are finalized. Inquire with your college or university international student office about any temporary housing,hotel, motel,  or other arrangements that may need to be made if you are arriving early or during the weekend.

Arriving during working hours  typically Monday through Friday, about 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., in the United States is generally preferable.

USA  Get the name, address, and telephone number of the staff person at your U.S. university to contact in case of a travel delay or an emergency, and carry this with you during your trip. Also carry contact information for a person at home and for or another organization that could provide you with support if needed, such as an educational mission or sponsoring agency.

Purchase travel insurance that will cover the costs of your trip in case you should have to cancel or delay travel for some reason and that will pay expenses in case of a medical emergency during travel. You may also want to purchase baggage insurance to cover against loss, damage, or theft of your baggage.
USA  Pack Smart

Be aware what items may not be packed in carry-on luggage--only small amounts of liquids, aerosols, or gels are allowed, though they can be checked in packed luggage. Some of the less obvious things that you should not try to carry on a plane include razors; pocketknives; tools such as hammers or screwdrivers; and sports equipment such as golf clubs or pool cues. Luggage over allowed carry-on size (which varies somewhat by airline) must be checked and there are weight and size limits on these pieces as well without overweight fees being added.

Keep photocopies of transcripts, passport, visa, I-20, and other important documents in your luggage, separate from the original documents, which you will want to carry on. (You may want to leave an additional copy with someone at home.)

Take most of your initial funds (enough to pay expenses over the first few weeks while you set up a U.S. bank account, which may run to $1,500 or more) in the form of traveler’s checks. If possible, however, also obtain $100-200 of U.S. currency in small denominations—$1, $5, $10, and $20 bills—for expenses on arrival in case you are not able to immediately change money at the airport.

Make a list of your belongings according to where you packed them so you can more easily make a claim if any luggage is lost. Carry on a change of clothes, toiletries, and any essentials that you will need upon arrival or could not easily replace, including all important legal, medical, or academic documents.

All checked and your hand luggage is passed through scanners at airports and may also be opened. Random searches are also conducted—all travelers, including U.S. citizens, are subject to these searches.

Don’t wrap any gifts that you are bringing as they will be unwrapped in the case of a search. Leave luggage unlocked or use special TSA locks, in case officials need to search bags—otherwise they may be forced to break your locks. It’s better not to pack food or drink in checked luggage as some substances (such as chocolate) may activate machines screening for explosives. Do not stack books or other dense items together in your luggage; spread them out instead so they do not appear as an unidentifiable mass. For easier inspection, it’s suggested that you place small carry-on items such as toiletries together in clear bags and pack footwear on the top of other contents in checked luggage.

Be aware what items may not be packed in carry-on luggage—basically weapons, explosives, and incendiary materials. 

Matches and cigarette lighters with fuel may not be checked in luggage but up to two cigarette lighters and four packs of safety matches may be carried on board.

It’s also important to be aware of customs regulations. Some types of items that require a special permit for U.S. entry or that are entirely prohibited include any drugs and narcotics that are illegal in the United States , weapons, ammunition, and explosive materials including fireworks,  offensive-smelling or irritating materials such as pepper spray; fresh fruit, vegetables, plants, seeds, and other unprocessed plant products; wildlife or products made from endangered species; and fresh fish, meat, or seafood. You may also want to avoid packing substances that may be difficult for inspectors to identify.
USA  Getting Off the Ground

Travelers on international flights are generally advised to arrive at the airport at least two hours in advance.  

If you are traveling at a peak time such as a weekend or holiday, you will want to arrive even earlier.

Call ahead to reconfirm reservations, and also to confirm that your flight is on time.

You will need to show your boarding pass ,ticket confirmation and a piece of government-issued photo identification at security checkpoints, so have these readily accessible.

Only ticketed passengers traveling on the particular day will be allowed through security checkpoints.

All passengers are screened with a walk-through metal detector. Therefore, avoid wearing anything metal; take change and other metal objects out of your pockets before passing through the detector. If you set off the alarm, you will be asked to step aside for further screening with a handheld metal detector as well as a pat-down search.

You will be asked to take your laptop computer out of its case for separate screening. You also may be asked to turn on the computer or other electronic devices that you are carrying with you.

Footwear inspections are standard for anyone stopped for random searches; at some airports all passengers may be asked to remove shoes during screening. Shoes often have metal in their heels so you may want to consider taking them off before going through the metal detector even if it is not required.


USA  In the Air

No smoking is permitted on any U.S. flights. All passengers must by law obey any instructions given by the flight crew, including remaining seated during takeoff, landing, and periods of air turbulence. Do get out of your seat and walk a little at least every two hours, or do some basic stretches in your seat—sitting still for long periods is not only uncomfortable but can occasionally lead to dangerous blood clots.

Dry air in airplanes can cause dehydration, which makes jet lag worse. Drink plenty of water throughout the flight, eat lightly, and avoid caffeine and alcohol, which will make you more dehydrated.

To help you sleep, you may want to bring earplugs, an eye mask, and/or a neck pillow.

Airlines provide small pillows and blankets for you to use on board, and sometimes other conveniences.

Before landing, you will be given a customs form to complete. This should not be complicated assuming you have not brought any prohibited items. You will need to show it to customs inspectors at the airport.


USA  At the Airport

 

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